Families Go Wild! 7th July 2018

Today was a busy day in London, but a relatively quiet one on the farm. With not too many visitors or animals around while we were at work, we noticed we could hear the 'sounds of the city' from the farmyard.

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We started off our farmyard day by going round the different chicken coops to collect eggs. This has become our routine at the start of a farmyard day, and we enjoy the process of collecting and boxing up eggs, adding our own decorations to the farmshop's egg boxes!

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Once the eggs were priced up and displayed in the shop, we collected our tools and got to work mucking out Derek's and Bayleaf's stable. We followed the procedure for mucking out, sharing out the jobs fairly. Although we were in the shade, it was a really hot day, so we very sensibly took a break for water! It also gave us the opportunity to see how our plants were getting on!

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We cast our memory back to April, when we originally sowed the 'mystery squash' seeds. They aren't fruiting yet, so we still don't know what they are! It was great to see how much they've grown.

We had a good break, looking at and learning about the fruit of poppies, and helped some poppies spread their seeds! We then went back to the farmyard to finish mucking out. We made sure to tip the donkeys' old water into planted areas, to try and waste as little water as possible. We took turns filling the donkeys' water bucket, and spreading fresh wood shavings in their bedding area.

We finished the day with a visit to the pigs, and gave them a couple of windfall crab apples to enjoy. Looking forward to next week!

Note from Ilana: Poppies have a great mechanism for spreading seeds. Once the seeds have developed inside the fruit, the skin of the fruit dries, exposing holes near the top. The seeds are held inside the dried fruit, and are dispersed when the wind blows, with the fruit acting like a salt shaker! This type of seed dispersal is called a Censer mechanism.